How to Weigh Gold

         

Like other precious metals, gold is measured by troy weight. Most gold buyers use either grams (gm), pennyweight (dwt), grains (gr), or troy ounces (ozt). Below is a calculator and a chart that you can use to convert these units of weight.

Finding the weight of your gold is as simple as placing it onto a scale that measures in one of these weight units. A scale can be purchased at a local shop or online from websites like eBay.com for as little as $10. See the video below for a great example of how even an inexpensive scale can be accurate and simple to use!

Gold Weight Conversion Calculator

Quickly and easily convert gold (or any precious metal) weight unit using this calculator:

Simply enter the weight, then select the unit of measure and the calculator will automatically calculate and display the conversions below.

       Enter Gold Weight Here:

                  -   Grains
                  -   Grams
                  -   Pennyweight
                  -   Troy Ounces
                  -   Troy Pounds

gold-weight-conversion-chart

How to Weigh Gold With Stones

It is important to keep in mind when weighing your gold items that almost all gold buyers are only going to pay you for the weight of your gold and not for the weight of anything else your gold items might contain (i.e. diamonds, pearls, other gem stones, etc). Therefore, if you are selling items purely for melt value it is a good idea to remove anything that is not gold from the item before weighing it. This way you know exactly how much gold you actually have.

But what if you are thinking about selling a gold item which contains diamonds, pearls, etc. (to a pawnshop for example) that you believe might have a higher value as a whole piece of jewelry beyond its melt value? In this instance you CAN (and should) still get a good idea of how much gold your item contains. This way you can still have an accurate assessment of how much the items melt value alone is, which will give you “more ammunition” when negotiating the sale price of the item. To do this you simply need to subtract the weight of any “non-gold” pieces (i.e. diamonds, pearls, gem stones, etc.) from the total weight of the item.

Example: Let’s say you have a 14k gold ring which has a total weight of 4.7 grams and contains three diamonds that have a combined weight of two carats (two 0.5 carat diamonds and one 1 carat diamond). You then just simply convert the weight of the diamonds into grams, which would be 0.4 grams (1 carat = 0.2 grams) and then subtract that number from the total weight of the ring (4.7 – 0.4 = 4.3). Now you have a very good idea of just how much 14k gold you have, which in turn you can use to find what the “melt value” alone for your ring would be without having to take apart/destroy the ring! You can find conversions (as I did for the example above) as well as the weight of many common items used in making jewelry simply by doing a Google search. For the example above I simply typed in “carats to grams” in the Google search bar.